Chinese Etikette

  • Die richtige Reihenfolge der Einführung
    Generally speaking, Chinese people are not so particular about the personal order of any introduction on informal occasions. Positions and sexes do not suggest much difference. However, in formal introdutctions(e.g. at a conference or in nebotiations) the precedence is always given according to rank...
  • Chinesisch entschuldigen
    Chinese people say"I beg your pardon" or "sorry" for having done wrong , having disturbed people or having caused trouble. The apologies expressions of "duì bù qǐ " (sorry) ,"zhēn duì bù qǐ " (awfully sorry ) and "hěn bào qiàn "(pardon me ) are applicable to, for example, accidental d...
  • Bedeutet "Bú Yòng" nur die Weigerung?
    "bú yòng le" may be used to avoid bothering someone. If you think your help is neceesary, you'd better insist on your offer. Then your assistance is likely to be accepted with a "bù hǎo yì si "(sorry to trouble you),"má fan nǐ le "(sorry to bother you), which implies that your offer is apprec...
  • Vorrang und Höflichkeit
    Chinese people often give precedence to one another, especially according to seniority, in social communication. It is advisable for one to decline an offer if ine can. Supposing someone asks one to go first at an entrance, one may insist on him/her taking the precedence. If not, one doesn't seem to...
  • Chinesische Bescheidenheit
    Traditionally the Chinese people do not to like to show a high opinion of their own merits. Instead they are always modest about their achievements, or perfer a low-key statement to a display of their advantages. When you praised a Chinese reply"nǎ lǐ , nǎ lǐ "(well, it is nothing) to any compl...
  • Menschen sehen aus
    Chinese people are justly famous for their hospitality. A Chinese host often personally accompanies the leaving guests to the lift, or goes with them until they are out of his house or office, or even stand gazing after their parting. The farther the host escorts the guests, the greater an honour it...
  • Chinesische Ausdrücke der guten Wünsche
    hinese good wishes are expressed on holidays and festivals or at birthday parties. Such expressions vary from one to another. The most commonly used ones are"shēng rì kuài lè "(Happy birthday),"zhù nǐ jiàn kāng cháng shòu "(Wish you good health and long life),"zhù nǐ fú rú dōng hǎi ...
  • Chinesische Privatsphäre
    Among close Chinese friends the topic of conversation may be unlimited, varying from one's age, income, marriage etc... Don't be embarrassed, as a matter of fact, they are not so interested in your personal secrets. Instead , they just want to show you their care by widening the topic. You don't hav...
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